• large metal uconn sign

Message of Welcome

Welcome to the University of Connecticut’s Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice page!  This site will serve as the University’s central hub for diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice (DEIJ) information and initiatives.  It will provide resources, opportunities for engagement, and celebrations of the many diverse communities who call UConn “home.”

UConn is committed to diversity, a crucial part of the University's mission.  We also believe that diversity makes our campuses better places to learn and work and positions UConn as a state, regional, and local leader in education, research, and outreach.  Quite simply, we believe that the diversity of our communities makes UConn stronger.

The important transformational work related to DEIJ will only be successful if the University has buy-in and input from our entire community; no singular department or unit can do this work on its own.  This website provides an entry point for every member of the UConn community – whether a student, alumni, staff, faculty, or a member of the surrounding communities, we invite you to join in this important work with us.  Together, we can improve the UConn experience for every member of our community.

Mission Statement

The University of Connecticut is committed to building a safe and inclusive community for all its members through diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Under the guidance of the Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer, Dr. Frank Tuitt, we as members of the UConn community aim to listen, reflect, learn, and act to make our community safe and a place of belonging for all. We aim to support diversity, equity, and inclusion through offering support for success for people of all backgrounds.

Land Acknowledgement

We would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the territory of the Eastern Pequot, Golden Hill Paugussett, Lenape, Mashantucket Pequot, Mohegan, Nipmuc and Schaghticoke Peoples who have stewarded this land throughout the generations. We thank them for their strength and resilience in protecting this land, and aspire to uphold our responsibilities according to their example.

Pronunciations: Eastern Pequot (Pea-kwaht); Golden Hill Paugussett (paw-GUS-it); Lenape (Leh-NAH-pay); Mashantucket Pequot (Mash-un-tuck-it Pea-kwaht);  Mohegan (Mo-he-gan); Nipmuc (Nip-muck); Schaghticoke (ska-teh-COKE)

Upcoming Events

  1. Jun 8 Rainbow Center and UConn Foundation Presents: Pride in the Park 12:00pm
  2. Jun 22 Rainbow Center and UConn Foundation Presents: West Hartford Pride 12:00pm

UConn Today

Statements

May 2024 Heritage Celebrations

To the UConn Community:  The Office for Diversity and Inclusion and the Provost’s Office would like to remind you of several celebrations, commemorations, and moments of raising awareness for members of our community during the month of May:  Heritage and Awareness Months:  Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month: May is Asian Pacific American Heritage […]

[Read More]

April 2024 Heritage Celebrations

The Office for Diversity and Inclusion and the Provost’s Office would like to remind you of several celebrations, commemorations, and moments of raising awareness for members of our community during the month of April: Heritage Month Celebrations: Arab American Heritage Month: During the month of April, cultural institutions, schools, legislatures, and organizations across the country […]

[Read More]

March 2024 Heritage Celebrations

The Office for Diversity and Inclusion and the Provost’s Office would like to remind you of several celebrations, commemorations, and moments of raising awareness for members of our community during the month of March: Heritage Month Celebrations: Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month: The United States has observed Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month every March since 1987. Led […]

[Read More]
@uconndiversity
- Buddha Day (May 15): Buddha Day, also known as Buddha Jayanti, celebrates the birth of the founder of Buddhism, Prince Siddhartha Gautama, who later became the Gautama Buddha. Buddha Day is a lunar holiday and usually falls during the first full moon of May. Buddha’s birth is celebrated as part of the Vesak festival, which honors the three major events in his life: his birth, his enlightenment, and his death. Buddhists celebrate Vesak by decorating temples with flowers, singing hymns, and laying down offerings, and “bathing of the Buddha,” a ritual in which water is poured over small statues of the Buddha to cleanse bad karma and to reenact the events following his birth, when devas and spirits showered him with sacred waters from the sky. Buddhists are encouraged to do small acts of kindness, to refrain from any kind of killing, and to eat vegetarian food.

- Orthodox Easter or Pascha (May 5): The celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ by Orthodox Christians, especially in Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece, Lebanon, the Republic of North Macedonia, Romania, and Russia.

We welcome the celebration of each of these holidays on our campuses and encourage support for those requiring accommodations. You can find information and guidance about academic accommodations for religious observations on the Provost Office’s webpage.

To see more information about resources and events happening this month and throughout the semester, please visit our events page at www.diversity.uconn.edu/events. ODI writes these letters in collaboration with our partners across the UConn system. If we inadvertently omitted a cultural or religious holiday, please let us know by emailing us at diversity@uconn.edu.

- Buddha Day (May 15): Buddha Day, also known as Buddha Jayanti, celebrates the birth of the founder of Buddhism, Prince Siddhartha Gautama, who later became the Gautama Buddha. Buddha Day is a lunar holiday and usually falls during the first full moon of May. Buddha’s birth is celebrated as part of the Vesak festival, which honors the three major events in his life: his birth, his enlightenment, and his death. Buddhists celebrate Vesak by decorating temples with flowers, singing hymns, and laying down offerings, and “bathing of the Buddha,” a ritual in which water is poured over small statues of the Buddha to cleanse bad karma and to reenact the events following his birth, when devas and spirits showered him with sacred waters from the sky. Buddhists are encouraged to do small acts of kindness, to refrain from any kind of killing, and to eat vegetarian food.

- Orthodox Easter or Pascha (May 5): The celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ by Orthodox Christians, especially in Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece, Lebanon, the Republic of North Macedonia, Romania, and Russia.

We welcome the celebration of each of these holidays on our campuses and encourage support for those requiring accommodations. You can find information and guidance about academic accommodations for religious observations on the Provost Office’s webpage.

To see more information about resources and events happening this month and throughout the semester, please visit our events page at www.diversity.uconn.edu/events. ODI writes these letters in collaboration with our partners across the UConn system. If we inadvertently omitted a cultural or religious holiday, please let us know by emailing us at diversity@uconn.edu.
...

- Cinco de Mayo (May 5): Cinco de Mayo is an annual celebration of the Mexican military’s defeat of the Second French Empire in the Battle of Puebla in 1862. This holiday is not widely celebrated in Mexico; rather, it is often treated as a drinking holiday in the United States, often erroneously celebrating Mexican Independence Day, which is on September 16th.

- Mother’s Day (May 12): In the United States, Mother’s Day is celebrated on the second Sunday of May. While other countries have similar days of commemoration, dates and traditions vary. The American version of Mother’s Day was created in 1905 to honor the sacrifices mothers make for their children. Though originally a day of celebration for individuals and families, it was heavily commercialized after President Woodrow Wilson declared it a federal holiday in 1914.

- National Nurses Week (May 6 - 12), International Nurses Day (May 12): International Nurses Day is celebrated globally every May 12th, the birthday of Florence Nightingale. In the United States, the week leading up to International Nurses Day is National Nurses Week, which celebrates the profession and provides opportunities to promote understanding and appreciation of the invaluable contributions nurses make to our society. This year’s theme is "Nurses Make the Difference,” which honors the many invaluable ways that nurses make a difference in their patients’ experiences of care, dignity, and wellbeing, including as healthcare providers and advocates.

- Cinco de Mayo (May 5): Cinco de Mayo is an annual celebration of the Mexican military’s defeat of the Second French Empire in the Battle of Puebla in 1862. This holiday is not widely celebrated in Mexico; rather, it is often treated as a drinking holiday in the United States, often erroneously celebrating Mexican Independence Day, which is on September 16th.

- Mother’s Day (May 12): In the United States, Mother’s Day is celebrated on the second Sunday of May. While other countries have similar days of commemoration, dates and traditions vary. The American version of Mother’s Day was created in 1905 to honor the sacrifices mothers make for their children. Though originally a day of celebration for individuals and families, it was heavily commercialized after President Woodrow Wilson declared it a federal holiday in 1914.

- National Nurses Week (May 6 - 12), International Nurses Day (May 12): International Nurses Day is celebrated globally every May 12th, the birthday of Florence Nightingale. In the United States, the week leading up to International Nurses Day is National Nurses Week, which celebrates the profession and provides opportunities to promote understanding and appreciation of the invaluable contributions nurses make to our society. This year’s theme is "Nurses Make the Difference,” which honors the many invaluable ways that nurses make a difference in their patients’ experiences of care, dignity, and wellbeing, including as healthcare providers and advocates.
...

The Office for Diversity and Inclusion and the Provost’s Office would like to remind you of several celebrations, commemorations, and moments of raising awareness for members of our community during the month of May:

Heritage and Awareness Months:

- Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month: May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. This national heritage celebration began in 1978 when Congress established a week to honor the contributions Asians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders have made to the United States.

- Haitian Heritage Month: This national heritage month celebrates Haitian culture and traditions. It is an expansion of Haitian Flag Day (May 18th), which commemorates Haiti’s revolution from France and the formation of the world’s first Black republic. Haitian Flag Day is honored both in Haiti and by Haitians living in the diaspora, especially in the U.S., which is home to the largest Haitian diaspora in the world.

- Jewish American Heritage Month: This national heritage month recognizes more than 350 years of Jewish contributions to the United States, paying tribute to generations of Jewish Americans who helped form the fabric of American history, culture, and society.

- Mental Health Awareness Month: Mental Health Awareness month raises awareness about our emotional, psychological, and social well-being, and educates the public about mental health, living with mental health conditions, and strategies for improving mental health and wellness.

- Military Appreciation Month and Memorial Day (May 27): Memorial Day began as a day set aside for families and friends to visit and decorate the graves of loved ones lost during the American Civil War.

- Older Americans Month: This heritage month was established by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 to acknowledge the contributions of older persons in the country and raise awareness about this community’s growing needs and concerns.

- Foster Care Awareness Month: National Foster Care Awareness month honors and recognizes the unique experiences of over 300,000 children and youth in foster care in the United States.

The Office for Diversity and Inclusion and the Provost’s Office would like to remind you of several celebrations, commemorations, and moments of raising awareness for members of our community during the month of May:

Heritage and Awareness Months:

- Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month: May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. This national heritage celebration began in 1978 when Congress established a week to honor the contributions Asians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders have made to the United States.

- Haitian Heritage Month: This national heritage month celebrates Haitian culture and traditions. It is an expansion of Haitian Flag Day (May 18th), which commemorates Haiti’s revolution from France and the formation of the world’s first Black republic. Haitian Flag Day is honored both in Haiti and by Haitians living in the diaspora, especially in the U.S., which is home to the largest Haitian diaspora in the world.

- Jewish American Heritage Month: This national heritage month recognizes more than 350 years of Jewish contributions to the United States, paying tribute to generations of Jewish Americans who helped form the fabric of American history, culture, and society.

- Mental Health Awareness Month: Mental Health Awareness month raises awareness about our emotional, psychological, and social well-being, and educates the public about mental health, living with mental health conditions, and strategies for improving mental health and wellness.

- Military Appreciation Month and Memorial Day (May 27): Memorial Day began as a day set aside for families and friends to visit and decorate the graves of loved ones lost during the American Civil War.

- Older Americans Month: This heritage month was established by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 to acknowledge the contributions of older persons in the country and raise awareness about this community’s growing needs and concerns.

- Foster Care Awareness Month: National Foster Care Awareness month honors and recognizes the unique experiences of over 300,000 children and youth in foster care in the United States.
...